Fig. 4c A Jaunt to Jamrach’s from The Era 13th Sep 1884

Excerpt from:  A Jaunt to Jamrach’s, The Era, Sat 13 Sep, 1884. Journalist unknown.

‘As we pass the entrance to Bett’s-street (which leads out of St. George’s-street in a northerly direction) a certain local excitement is apparent. We learn from a man in a white jacket who has just come from the scene of the action that a monkey has escaped Jamrach’s, and, having succeeded in gaining the top of a high building, is at present defying his pursuers. It is reassuring to learn that he is practically hemmed in, and that his escape is hopeless… we pass along till we reach a bric-a-brac shop with “C. Jamrach” on a brass plate on the door. Next to it is the animal shop itself. As we enter a strong bird-like aroma is perceptible; and, amidst the chatter of a hundred feathered captives, we introduce ourselves to Mr Jamrach, jun. He is a handsome, educated-looking man, with a very slight foreign accent. It is soon apparent that he is no ordinary animal dealer. He takes a keen delight in all knowledge connected with his business apart from the questions of profit, with which, however, the fullest information is inseparably connected in animal dealing as in any occupation. For instance, Mr Jamrach tells us how, some years ago, a curious bird was offered to him for sale. Neither his father nor himself could say to what species it belonged but it apparently was a variety of pigeon. He finally sold it to the Zoological Gardens for £10. It was afterwards decided by the naturalists that the strange bird was one of the few remaining specimens of the Dodo family, and would have been worth to Mr Jamrach, had he been aware of its quality, some £100 or so!’


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